Welcome to Mellow's Log Cabin. This blog's purpose is to supply information on a diversity of American southern music - ranging from country, blues, old-time and folk to R&B, rock'n'roll and rockabilly. I regularly present my research results about artists, labels, shows and also give guest writers a chance to publish their texts here on occasion.

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• Additions to Eddie Bond discography.
• Massive update on Blake Records. Thanks to Eric from Goner Records (Memphis, TN)!
• Discography updates on Willie Gregg.

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Thursday, February 4, 2010

Shelton Brothers day

The Shelton Brothers' success was limited to the middle to late 1930s, mainly because they had a sound that was similar to that of the 1920s. Founded by brothers Bob and Joe Attlesey, they were later joined by other muscians. In 1933, the two brothers got their first break recording as members of Leon Chapalear's Lone Star Cowboys for Bluebird. After moving to New Orleans, they began to appear as the "Shelton Brothers" and held their first recording session for Decca in Febuary of 1935. Their recorded material was dominated by their guitar/mandolin duo and on that session, they cut their famous "Deep Elm Blues". They were joined by fiddler Curly Fox at their next sessions and eventually founded a whole band with Lonnie Hall, Harry Sorensen, Gene Sullivan and Slim Harbert. Through the 1930s, the Sheltons had some good selling records, such as "Sittin' On Top of the World", "Match Box Blues", "Deep Elm Blues", and "Just Because" (later covered by Elvis Presley). During the 1940s and 1950s, their recording career was over (except for a couple of sides for King in the late 1940s) and they focused on appearing on several Texas radio programs, such as the Saturday Night Shindig, the Texas Barn Dance, the Red River Jamboree, the East Texas Hillbilly Jamboree, and also the Louisiana Hayride from Shreveport, Louisiana. Joe died in 1980, Bob in 1983.

1. Just Because (recorded on Febuary 23, 1935, in Chicago)
2. Sittin' On Top of the World (recorded either on August 20, 1935, or December 19, 1935)

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